Thursday, July 09, 2009

Can't Happen Here


Notice how there is a condemnation of St. Vincent dePaul and Salvation Army and other various socialist slants in the text. Well at least in 1933 those concepts were considered socialist. I think they changed the name to "Hope Now."

10 comments:

wagga said...

So would kc be first in line?

averagerainfall said...

No, the protest is clearly being attended by "workers" -- that is, people who work.

So, no, Casey wouldn't be there. ;-p

sm_landlord said...

OK, I must have been asleep in history class on the day that they discussed why the communists hated the charities in 1933.

Can anyone fill me in on the philosophy?

Peripheral Visionary said...

I think the anger directed at the charities is what we would refer to as a "sense of entitlement"; like the poor complaining that they're not getting enough in their welfare check or their unemployment check (the Federal government having replaced the charitable organizations, and having dropped the requirement that those receiving money actually do any work for it.)

The thought that someone should consider themselves lucky enough to be receiving a check, whether for work performed or no, was as foreign a thought back then as it is now.

Rob Dawg said...

Religion and competition with the State.

sm_landlord said...

OK, I get it. Thanks for the quick replies. So that was before there was an unencumbered dole as we know it today. And in a political sense, the communists did not want to let a good crisis go to waste.

Mr. Outspoken said...

One complaint of socialists against charities (as exemplified in the Parable of the Water Tank) is that goods are the natural and equal property of all society. The idea of a capitalist charitably giving some portion of his unearned wealth is hypocrytical. Such passive wealth is already the right of all workers. By charitably giving, he is distracting from the real issue of social justice, while reaffirming his rights to profit from the labor of others.

sm_landlord said...

I had to look up the parable of the water tank, and to my surprise, it was written by Edward Bellamy, the author of "Looking Backward". I first read that book about 15 years ago, and I remember thinking: "what a crock, where did I leave my Orwell?"

The audacity of socialist utopianism.

Likkered Up said...

I hope someone in the Obama administration is spooling up plans for more soup kitchens. People today are a _lot_ further away from the production of food then they were in the 1930s.

Rob Dawg said...

Farm supports at one end, soup kitchens at the other and Uncle Sugar with a hand in every step of the way.