Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Good Fog - Bad Fog


Apparently the California Coastal Redwoods are in danger from a lack of fog caused by... you guessed it; global warming.

At the same time earlier today a jet owned by a principal of Tesla Motors crashed killing three taking off from Palo Alto in heavy... you guessed it; fog.


Coastal Fog: WUWT and UCSB

Tesla Exec crash: Reuters and Auto Spies

10 comments:

Sweet Cashback said...

I think your FIRST f(r)og story was better.....

Property Flopper said...

As climate change continues, different areas will change and some plants/animals will die out.

Redwoods can't migrate, so...

Orange10 said...

What's new in Camarillo, you bloated walrus?

w said...

Why can't plants migrate?

Doug said...

Kinda funny.. but I doubt the NTSB Probable Cause will be "Fog."

Jean ValJean said...

Remind me again.. but I believe I've been hearing this predicted somewhere.....

Just days after becoming controller of financially strapped Harrisburg, Pa., in January, Daniel Miller began uttering an obscure term that baffled most people who had never heard it and chilled those who had: Chapter 9.

The seldom-used part of U.S. bankruptcy law gives municipalities protection from creditors while developing a plan to pay off debts. Created in the wake of the Great Depression, Chapter 9 is widely considered a last resort and filings under it are more taboo than other parts of bankruptcy code because of the resulting uncertainty for everyone from municipal employees to bondholders.

The economic slump, however, is forcing debt-laden cities, towns and smaller taxing districts throughout the U.S. to consider using Chapter 9. As their revenue declines faster than expenses, some public entities are scrambling to keep making payments on municipal bonds. And that is causing experts to worry about the safety of securities traditionally considered low risk.
Since Chapter 9 was enacted in 1934, just 600 cases have been filed under the code, partly because they require state approval. Some municipalities have found escape hatches, such as raising taxes. The largest Chapter 9 case was filed in 1994, when Orange County, Calif., lost $1.6 billion on wrong-way bets on interest rates.

But many experts fear that a surge in municipal bankruptcy filings is unavoidable. "The day of reckoning is coming," says Michael Pagano, dean of the University of Illinois at Chicago's College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704398804575071591602878062.html?mod=WSJ_Markets_section_Bonds

Rob Dawg said...

Remind me again.. but I believe I've been hearing this predicted somewhere.....
Chapter 9.


Yup, you hear it first. And it will be a cascade series of events if it starts up in California. It is very likely that the hints will be in a diffrent court. The State is trying to delay disbursements to municipalities and they are suing. If they get even delayed they'll "threaten" to Chapter 9. That will precipitate a crisis. What was meant to be a bargaining position will be a self fulfilling event.

segfault said...

Related to "Hide the Decline:"

http://www.plumbreport.com/?p=2698

Look for the heading "Concealed Supply."

getyourselfconnected said...

Its a PUSH

Pleather Murse said...

Gotta love this one. Another old-fashioned patriot unafraid to strike at the heart of the beast pig system, yet smart enough not to make himself a martyr unnecessarily:

Frustrated Owner Bulldozes Home Ahead Of Foreclosure

Like many people, Terry Hoskins has had troubles with his bank. But his solution to foreclosure might be unique. Hoskins said he's been in a struggle with RiverHills Bank over his Clermont County home for nearly a decade, a struggle that was coming to an end as the bank began foreclosure proceedings on his $350,000 home.

Hoskins said the Internal Revenue Service placed liens on his carpet store and commercial property on state Route 125 after his brother, a one-time business partner, sued him. The bank claimed his home as collateral, Hoskins said, and went after both his residential and commercial properties.

Hoskins said he'd gotten a $170,000 offer from someone to pay off the house, but the bank refused, saying they could get more from selling it in foreclosure.

Hoskins told News 5's Courtis Fuller that he issued the bank an ultimatum. "I'll tear it down before I let you take it," Hoskins told them. And that's exactly what Hoskins did.

http://www.wlwt.com/news/22600154/detail.html